Courses 2016-17 ITALIAN

Spring 2017 Italian Courses


ITAL 1: Introductory Italian I @ 9L

ITAL 2: Introductory Italian II @ 9L, 10

ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 9L

ITAL 11: Intensive Italian @ 12 (Alberti) This 1-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  Italian 11 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 1 and 2 in one term offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere to learn Italian. The course will have a web-based component, which, through cultural, grammar and multimedia learning activities, will complement face-to-face work and prepare students for their in-class work. In this course, students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for Italian 3 or apply for our Italian LSA in Rome. With the goal to facilitate the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in Italian.  Prerequisite: One year or equivalent of university level instruction in a Romance Language or Latin; or three high school years of instruction in a Romance Language or Latin; or native speaking proficiency in a Romance Language; or permission of instructor.

ITAL 10: Introduction to Italian Literature: Masterworks and Great Issues

  • Ital 10.06 The Culture of Food in Italian Literature, 1300-2013 @ 10A (Convertini) Food and flavors pervade Italian literature, expressing the historical hunger of a social class, the nourishment of the spirit, or simply the pleasure of the senes.  Through various texts and genres from the Middle Ages to the present, we will examine the culture of food and its social and symbolic value through the centuries.  This course will be conducted entirely in Italian and will have an interactive format.

ITAL 27: Topics in Italian Literature

  • Ital 27.02 Culture and/in Translation: Theory and Practice @ 11 (Canepa) Human communication depends on translation. Much of what we know about worlds different from our own comes through translations and the dialogues between languages and cultures that they create.  In this course we will focus on translation between Italian and American cultures, and consider the larger question of the representation of “foreignness.” We will explore the theory and practice of translation in various contexts—literature, film, popular media—and gain direct experience in the art of translation through workshops and a final project. 

FRIT 33.01 Dante's "Divine" Comedy @ 6B (Hooper) Is there an afterlife? What is it like? Who may describe the hereafter in this world and shape my behavior? These are the ever-present questions that Dante’s Comedy poses. The course’s central themes will be exile and paradise: Exile means both Dante’s own banishment and the universal pilgrimage of life; paradise is the unattainable homecoming of true happiness. Students will explore the poem, its sources, and reception, developing a rigorous yet personal response to Dante’s Comedy   Open to all students. Text, lectures and discussion in English. Students taking the course for major or minor credit in Italian will attend a weekly x-hour and do all written work in Italian.

 

Winter 2017 Italian Courses


ITAL 1: Introductory Italian I @ 9L, 10

ITAL 2: Introductory Italian II @ 9L, 10

ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 10

ITAL 15: Italian Cinema @ 2 (Convertini) Conducted in Italian, this course introduces students to classic Italian cinema, including its history and its predominant genres-from the silent film to comedy and melodrama and thriller. Students will become familiar with Italian cinematic movements such as Neorealism, directors such as Federico Fellini and Roberto Benigni, as well as with important concepts in film analysis.

ITAL 23: Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Italian Literature and Culture @ 12 (Canepa) This course explores the rich innovations that marked Italian literature and the arts over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, from the Baroque culture of crisis and change to the Enlightenment's own reassessment of earlier forms of knowledge and representation. Topics include the poetics of the marvelous, the fascination with popular culture, the nuova scienza, social class and identity, the "cult of reason," and the relevance of both Baroque and Enlightenment categories to post-modernity. We will explore traditional genres such as lyric poetry, the essay, and the novella, but also new forms: the fairy tale, women's writing, travel literature, the commedia dell'arte, the novel, and the opera. Authors and artists may include Giambattista Basile, Giambattista Marino, Galileo, Arcangela Tarabotti, Isabella Andreini, Monteverdi, Pergolesi, Bernini, Caravaggio, and Carlo Goldoni. There will also be units on books, visual arts and music, with guest lectures and visits to Rauner Special Collections and the Hood Museum.

LSA+ in Rome (Quaintance)

2016-17

Fall 2016 Italian Courses


ITAL 1: Introductory Italian I @ 9L, 10

ITAL 2: Introductory Italian II @ 9L

ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 10

ITAL 25: Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Italian Literature and Culture @ 11  (Benvegnu) This course examines the radical transformation of literary form and vision that characterizes twentieth and twenty-first century Italy with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to Italian identity posed by modernization, immigration, and globalization. We will use poetry, fiction, autobiography, political writings, television, documentaries, and film to explore cultural movements such as the avant-garde and neo-realism. Particular contexts may include fascism, the resistance movements, and terrorism. Students will read canonical and non-canonical texts including, for example, recent immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Bontempelli, Moravia, Morante, Calvino, Maraini, Fellini, Tornatore, Wertmueller, and Jadelin Mabiala Gambo.

FRIT 93: Foreign Language Teaching Methods: Theory and Practice @ 10A (Convertini) The course will provide a historical overview of approaches to foreign language (FL) teaching and learning and the theoretical notions underlying current pedagogical trends and classroom practices. Some of the topics that will be covered during the class discussion include: The National Standards for Foreign Language Learning; the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages; language learning and critical thinking; multiple intelligence in language learning; the integration of literature and culture in FL teaching; and digital pedagogy in the 21st century language classroom. Students will have the opportunity to apply course content through micro-teaching sessions, class-troubleshooting situations, class observations and the development of tasks and assessments. The course will also offer students the opportunity to reflect on language learning on a personal level, to find out how they think as language learners and how they can empower themselves to learn languages in an active and engaged manner. Open to all students. Text, lectures and discussion in English. Students taking the course for major or minor credit in Italian will attend a weekly x-hour and do all written work in Italian.

ITAL 85: Independent Reading and Research (AR)

ITAL 88: Senior Independent Reading and Research (AR)

ITAL 89: Honors Seminar (AR)

 

2016-17

Summer 2016 Italian Courses


ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 11 (Quaintance)

WGSS 48.7/FRIT 34.01 Sex and Gender in the Italian Renaissance @ 10 (Quaintance) This interdisciplinary course explores conceptions of sex and gender in Italian Renaissance literature and visual art.  We’ll trace a social history of love and sex in Renaissance Italy, examine how sex and sexual bodies were represented in literature and in images, and look at how governments and the Church attempted to manage and punish sexual transgression.  Themes we will investigate include representations of male and female bodies, gender roles for both men and women, sexual violence, same-sex desire, and cross-dressing.

ITAL 85: Independent Reading and Research (AR)

ITAL 88: Senior Independent Reading and Research (AR)

ITAL 89: Honors Seminar (AR)