COURSES 2017-18 FRENCH

2017-18

Summer 2017 French Courses

French 3: Introductory French III @ 11 (McConnell)

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language @ 12 (McConnell) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

FREN 10: Introduction to French Literature
 

  • French 10.18: The Medieval Mirror of Ourselves @ 10A (Czerniak) Perhaps more than any other era, the Middle Ages inspired modern French literature. Things medieval intrigued writers and artists throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with interest at its strongest during the nineteenth century's rise in national pride and focus on national origins. But artists and scholars also looked beyond medieval literature to traditions in architecture, interior decoration, and pictorial art.  The Middle Ages served as a mirror in which French people contemplated both their identity and their destiny. Present still today throughout France in cities, symbols, churches and documents, the medieval period has continued to solicit our imaginations in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

FREN 80: French Literature and the Other Arts
 

  • French 80.04: Color Coding: The Intensive Use of Color in Medieval Media @ 2A (Czerniak) In medieval Western Europe, civilization was a culture of color. Color was omnipresent, whether in interior or exterior paintings, in sacred or secular architecture, in sculpture, furniture or illustrated manuscripts.  A church was not considered complete until it had been painted. Mural paintings adorned with narrative scenes or decorative figures sought to embellish God's earthly Creation; to paint was to undertake a spiritual endeavor.   At the same time, color and images aimed to teach; no scene or figure was without meaning.  From the walls of medieval edifices to the pages of manuscripts, we will explore in this seminar pictorial creation in France from the seventh through the fifteenth centuries.

2017-18

Fall 2017 French Courses

French 1: Introductory French I @ 9L, 11, 10

French 2: Introductory French II @ 9L, 10, 10, 11

French 3: Introductory French III @ 11, 10, 11

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language @ 12 (Wine), 10 (McConnell) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.03 Invitation au Voyage @ 11 (Beasley) In this course we will examine travel narratives as well as literary works that inspire us to travel physically and metaphorically.  How do words express as well as transform the traveler's experience?  How do we engage with other worlds through literature?  How do texts create other worlds?  We will examine texts and their contexts from the middle ages to the present.

French 23: Introduction to French Literature II: Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century @ 10 (Wine)  The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were a dynamic and volatile period characterized on the one hand by the rise to power of the most absolute of all monarchs, the Sun King Louis XIV, symbolized by Versailles, and on the other hand by the French Revolution. Fostered by royal patronage, literature and the arts flourished, yet many writers also used artistic expression to counter this royal power. The period saw the birth of the modern French novel and the development of a rich body of theatrical and philosophical literature. These centuries are recognized as major components of France's collective identity and their influence is still felt in France today. Authors may include Descartes, Corneille, Racine, Molière, Lafayette, Diderot, Rousseau, Voltaire, Graffigny, Beaumarchais and Laclos.

French 40: French Literature: The Approach Through Genre

  • French 40.06 Selfies: autobiographie, autoportrair, autofiction @ 10A (Kritzman)  A study of three forms of writing about the self and their generic distinctions. Autobiography, a practice of self-understanding deals with the construction of one’s life story across time; self-portraiture does not attempt to rejoin the past by the construction of a self that is temporally constructed. The autoportraitist presents a self apprehended in the present of writing through a montage of disparate images. Autofiction, on the other hand,  deals with a form of fictionalized autobiography that uses fiction in the service of the search for self.  Subjects to be examined include: rhetoric, politics, history, and gender.  Texts: Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Sartre, Beauvoir (autobiographies,); Montaigne, Sevigne, Barthes (autoportraits);  Colette, Modiano, Ernaux (autofictions).

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

FSP in Paris with Optional Internship (Hollister)

2017-18

Winter 2018 French Courses

French 1: Introductory French I @ 9L

French 2: Introductory French II @ 9L, 10, 10

French 3: Introductory French III @ 11, 10, 10

French 11:  Intensive French @ 11 (Mosenthal) This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. The course will have a web-based component, which, through cultural, grammar and multimedia learning activities, will complement face-to-face work and prepare students for in-class work. Students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course, making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for French 3 or apply for our French LSAs in Lyon or Toulouse. With the goal of facilitating the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in French.

French 7: First Year Seminar @ 12 (Wine)

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language
@ 11 (Elhariry) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.13 Games People Play @ 10 (Wine) For both adults and children, fun and games can be serious business. This course explores the cultural and social functions of games and play as depicted in literature and film. We will be especially interested in differences in the way the French and Americans play, focusing on notions like fun, playfulness, and humor. Readings may include works by Scudéry, Molière, Marivaux, Maupassant, and Pagnol.

French 21: Introduction to Francophone Literature @ 11 (Walker)  This course surveys the evolution of French language (Francophone) literature of the former French colonies and examines the social, political, and cultural issues it raises: race, colonialism, decolonization, revolution, independence, neo-colonialism, Négritude, Antillanité, Créolité, écriture féminine, mimetic desire, cultural hybridity, post-independence government and society. The survey will include novels, plays, poetry, film and essays by representative writers from the principal divisions of the Francophone world: the French West Indies, the Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa; Quebec, and Francophone Canada.

French 24: Introduction to French Literature and Culture III: Nineteenth Century @ 2 (St. Clair)  This course examines the nineteenth-century renewal of literary form and vision from the French Revolution to the First World War. We will study the social and historical developments of French culture as they are reflected in various literary genres (narrative, poetry, dramatic theory and practice), literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and the other arts. Emphasis will be placed on France's growing self-awareness as a nation and on the analysis of aesthetic and intellectual issues represented in the major literary movements of this period including romanticism, realism, symbolism, art for art's sake, naturalism, fin de siècle decadence, and modernism. Readings may include works by such authors as Chateaubriand, de Staël, Stendhal, Hugo, Musset, Sand, Balzac, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Michelet, Zola, and Huysmans.

French 40: French Literature: The Approach through Genre

  • French 40.02 French and Francophone Poetry from Baudelaire through Césaire @ 12 (Elhariry) Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Guillaume Apollinaire, Paul Eluard, André Breton, Paul Valéry, Aimé Césaire, Léon Damas, D.T. Niane and Andrée Chedid are poets of radically different backgrounds connected by abiding preoccupations of a modernist vision. These poets will be studied in order to explore the traditions and counter-traditions of French and Francophone poetry. 

French 78: Senior Major Workshop @ 2A (Walker)  As part of this culminating experience, each major will work on an independent project, either a senior thesis or expanding upon work begun in a previous course. The independent project will be developed within the framework of this course using a selection of critical texts that can be viewed as models of literary, cultural, and historical analysis. Lectures by a variety of faculty members will supplement the readings. Students will gain mastery in literary and cultural analysis, close analytical reading skills and composition in French.  French 78 may be used to continue research on your honors thesis.  This course is open only to French and Italian Department senior majors or by petition, which is due by the fifth day of classes of Fall term.

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

LSA/LSA+ in Lyon (Higgins)

FSP in Paris (Beasley)

2017-18

Spring 2018 French Courses

French 1: Introductory French I @ 9L

French 2: Introductory French II @ 9L, 10

French 3: Introductory French III @ 9L, 10, 11

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language @ 12 (Cone) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

FREN 15: Business French and the French Economy @ 10 (Mosenthal)  This course will enable students to function in a French business environment. We will use departments of a company (human resources, production, sales, finance and administration) to acquire a knowledge of business terminology and practices. Using company web sites and the business press, students will become familiar with important companies and the environment in which they operate.  NOTE: This course does not count toward the major or the minor. Upon completion of this course, students may take the exam for the DFP (Diplôme de Français Professionnel - Français des Affaires).

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.17 Saints, Martyrs, Demons @ 10 (Hollister)  Many of French fiction’s most iconic characters have been marked as holy or unholy, saintly or damned. This course will ask what the famous saints, martyrs and demons of French cultural history have to say about morality, politics, and social issues (notably class, gender, race, and sexuality). Works by Racine, Voltaire, Sade, Diderot, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Eluard, Aragon, Bataille, Sartre, Barthes, Clouzot, Bresson, Césaire, and Yourcenar.

French 22: Introduction to French Literature I: The Middle Ages and the Renaissance @ 10A (Tarnowski) Medieval France - its art, architecture, technology, philosophy and literature - exerted an unparalleled influence throughout Europe. Studying the first texts written in French, as well as the manuscripts in which they circulated, will shed light on the nature of French culture. We will examine defining issues of the period: the transition from oral to written expression, the invention of printing, debates concerning the status of women, Renaissance humanism, scientific inquiry, religious reform and conflict. Texts may include La Chanson de Roland, selected poetry, and works by Chrétien de Troyes, Christine de Pizan, Marguerite de Navarre, François Rabelais, and Michel de Montaigne.

French 25: Introduction to French Literature and Culture IV: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries @ 11 (Hollister) This course examines the radical transformations of literary form and vision that characterize twentieth-century France with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to French identity posed by immigration and globalization. We will use lyric poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and film to explore literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the new novel, the theater of the absurd and écriture féminine, as well as the recent impact of immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Proust, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Delbo, Cixous, Sebbar, Resnais, Malle, and Kassovitz.

French 40:  French Literature: The Approach Through Genre

  • French 40.05 Acting French @ 3A (Sanders) Acting French offers a practical approach to French theater. Throughout the trimester, we will read, analyze and then perform scenes from French plays. In this class, you will have an opportunity to bring Figaro to life, or to wait for Godot. By the end of the trimester, we will learn how to interpret theater as a performance, and use that knowledge to put on scenes from plays.

French 53: French Thought: Philosophical Issues

  • French 53.08 Paris, philosophies de l'espace @ 2 (LaGuardia)  Paris has been described in numerous disciplines and media:  literature, philosophy, cinema, photography, painting, sociology, geography, etc.  What usage schemes characterize the city?  How are often conflicting identities generated when individuals seek to inhabit and negotiate the hierarchies of its neighborhoods? How do diverse thinkers, filmmakers, and photographers describe and represent the class, ethnic, and gender clashes that play out in urban space?  In what ways do affective “investments” saturate Parisian streets, buildings, and businesses?

FRIT 37: Topics in Literature and Culture

  • FRIT 37.03 Black Feminisms in the French Atlantic @ 2A (Batraville) French colonialism and particularly French transatlantic slavery between the 17th and 19th centuries produced a shared linguistic and cultural legacy as well as a sustained political struggle carried by Black populations in France, sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and Québec. Although combatting racial inequality and white supremacy is generally understood through the lens of movements in the US, or the example of South African apartheid, this course invites students to consider such undertakings from a fundamentally transnational point of view by focusing on Black Feminisms in the French-speaking African diaspora. Open to all students. Text, lectures and discussion in English.

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

FSP in Paris (St. Clair)

LSA/LSA+ in Toulouse (Elhariry)