Courses 2017-18 ITALIAN

2017-18

Summer 2017 Italian Courses

2017-18

Fall 2017 Italian Courses

ITAL 1: Introductory Italian I @ 9L, 10, 6A

ITAL 2: Introductory Italian II @ 11

ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 9L, 11

ITAL 15: Italian Cinema @ 10A (Convertini) Conducted in Italian, this course introduces students to classic Italian cinema, including its history and its predominant genres-from the silent film to comedy and melodrama and thriller. Students will become familiar with Italian cinematic movements such as Neorealism, directors such as Federico Fellini and Roberto Benigni, as well as with important concepts in film analysis.

FRIT 35: Modern Italian Culture and Society

  • FRIT 35.02: Fascisms @ 2 (Parati) This class is about fascisms and the plural is not a typo.  We will ask ourselves the question: how did fascism rise to power?  Why did people support it? We will focus initially on the original model for fascist dictatorships, that is Italian fascism, but we will also have in-class presentations by Dartmouth professors on German, Spanish, French and Japanese forms of fascism.  This is a course that will concentrate on history, film, literature, and fashion in order to talk about the slippery definitions of fascism.

ITAL 22: Humanism and Renaissance @ 10 (Canepa) This course explores the extraordinary cultural production of Italy from the late fourteenth to the end of the sixteenth century—the Renaissance. Students will examine broader social and historical contexts through topics such as humanism; attitudes toward the ancient world and the “discovery” of new worlds; developments in the visual arts and in science; court society; sexuality and courtesan culture; gender and family life; religious reform. Genres considered may include essay, dialogue, political treatise, theatre, lyric and epic poetry, letters, and the novella. Authors may include Petrarch, Alberti, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Isabella di Morra, Veronica Franco, Ruzante, Castiglione, Ariosto, Bandello, and Tasso.

LSA/LSA+ in Rome

2017-18

Winter 2018 Italian Courses

ITAL 1: Introductory Italian I @ 9L, 10

ITAL 2: Introductory Italian II @ 11, 6A

ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 10

ITAL 11: Intensive Italian @ 11 (Alberti) This 1-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  Italian 11 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 1 and 2 in one term offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere to learn Italian. The course will have a web-based component, which, through cultural, grammar and multimedia learning activities, will complement face-to-face work and prepare students for their in-class work. In this course, students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for Italian 3 or apply for our Italian LSA in Rome. With the goal to facilitate the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in Italian.
 
Prerequisite: One year or equivalent of university level instruction in a Romance Language or Latin; or three high school years of instruction in a Romance Language or Latin; or native speaking proficiency in a Romance Language; or permission of instructor.

ITAL 21: Early Italian Literature and Culture @ 6B (Hooper)

This course will introduce you to the earliest form of Italian literature, the lyric poem: its interpretation, its cultural importance and its material and historical context.
 
Our tasks during the term will be
1) to master the language and poetic forms of these ancient texts
2) to gain an insight into the social worlds in which the poets moved and
3) to understand the place of lyric poetry in that context.
 
The major theme of the poems we read, aside from love, will be space. Expressions of absence, loss, exile, military deployment, and psychosocial alienation stud these poems. We will explore this theme from within, using close literary analysis. And we will also approach it from without, using GIS mapping technology, manuscript facsimiles, and historical research to build concrete visualizations of the distances involved.
 
The readings for each class will be brief but will require careful attention. They will be accompanied by exercises to help you achieve the course goals: paraphrase, metrical analysis, translation, transcription from manuscript facsimiles, maintaining a glossary, recitation aloud, historical research, contributions to the class GIS resource.
 
By the end of the course you will be able to paraphrase a previously unseen sample of early Italian verse using a crib; analyze the meter of the major verse forms of the era (sonnet, canzone, ballad); recite from memory at least 8-10 lines of verse. You will also have gained an insight into the political and social history of the era that will help you understand the poems in context as well as in content and will add to your overall understanding of Italian history and culture.

 

FRIT 37: Topics in Literature and Culture

  • FRIT 37.04: Italian Fairy Tales @ 10 (Canepa) We will study the rich and precocious Italian fairy-tale tradition, from the Renaissance to our times, and the ways in which its forms and contents have evolved. We will address questions concerning canon formation; the role of “marvelous” genres such as the fairy tale in socialization and the expression of national identity; and the appropriation of fairy-tale subjects and motifs by contemporary popular culture. We will also acquaint ourselves with a variety of critical approaches to the fairy tale, and consider some of the other European fairy-tale traditions, especially the French and the German.  In this winter’s offering, the course will have a laboratory component in which students will write their own fairy tales and then turn them into hand-made books in the Book Arts Workshop in Baker-Berry Library.  This part of the course will also include workshops with children’s book author Tomie dePaola and storyteller Gioia Timpanelli.
     

LSA+ in Rome (Convertini)

2017-18

Spring 2018 Italian Courses

ITAL 1: Introductory Italian I @ 9L

ITAL 2: Introductory Italian II @ 9L, 10

ITAL 3: Introductory Italian III @ 10

ITAL 11: Intensive Italian @ 12 (Alberti) This 1-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  Italian 11 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 1 and 2 in one term offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere to learn Italian. The course will have a web-based component, which, through cultural, grammar and multimedia learning activities, will complement face-to-face work and prepare students for their in-class work. In this course, students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for Italian 3 or apply for our Italian LSA in Rome. With the goal to facilitate the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in Italian.
 
Prerequisite: One year or equivalent of university level instruction in a Romance Language or Latin; or three high school years of instruction in a Romance Language or Latin; or native speaking proficiency in a Romance Language; or permission of instructor

ITAL 10: Introduction to Italian Literature: Masterworks and Great Issues

  • ITAL 10.xx Before Facebook. Friendship in Italian Literature @ 10A (Pending) ( Convertini)  What does it mean to be friends, and what is it that distinguishes this unique experience?  How do people who are first distant from one another become close and connected? Italian novels, poems, short stories, fairy tales, screenplays, journalism and historical media will help us understand the voice of friendship as an essential human experience, a fundamental way of knowing the world.