2017-18 FRENCH AND ITALIAN IN TRANSLATION COURSES

2017-18

Fall 2017 FRIT Courses

FRIT 35: Modern Italian Culture and Society

  • FRIT 35.02: Fascisms @ 2 (Parati) This class is about fascisms and the plural is not a typo.  We will ask ourselves the question: how did fascism rise to power?  Why did people support it? We will focus initially on the original model for fascist dictatorships, that is Italian fascism, but we will also have in-class presentations by Dartmouth professors on German, Spanish, French and Japanese forms of fascism.  This is a course that will concentrate on history, film, literature, and fashion in order to talk about the slippery definitions of fascism.

2017-18

Winter 2018 FRIT Courses

FRIT 37: Topics in Literature and Culture

  • FRIT 37.04: Italian Fairy Tales @ 10 (Canepa) We will study the rich and precocious Italian fairy-tale tradition, from the Renaissance to our times, and the ways in which its forms and contents have evolved. We will address questions concerning canon formation; the role of “marvelous” genres such as the fairy tale in socialization and the expression of national identity; and the appropriation of fairy-tale subjects and motifs by contemporary popular culture. We will also acquaint ourselves with a variety of critical approaches to the fairy tale, and consider some of the other European fairy-tale traditions, especially the French and the German.

2017-18

Spring 2018 FRIT Courses

FRIT 37: Topics in Literature and Culture

  • FRIT 37.03 Black Feminisms in the French Atlantic @ 2A (Batraville) French colonialism and particularly French transatlantic slavery between the 17th and 19th centuries produced a shared linguistic and cultural legacy as well as a sustained political struggle carried by Black populations in France, sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and Québec. Although combatting racial inequality and white supremacy is generally understood through the lens of movements in the US, or the example of South African apartheid, this course invites students to consider such undertakings from a fundamentally transnational point of view by focusing on Black Feminisms in the French-speaking African diaspora. Open to all students. Text, lectures and discussion in English. (Cross-listed with AAAS 88.18; Dist:INT; WCult:CI)