Italian Upper Level Courses

ITAL 5: Language Study Abroad: The Art and Culture of Rome

A course, taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad Program, which concentrates on the artistic life and culture of Rome. Masterpieces of painting, sculpture and architecture are studied in their social and historical contexts. Visits to sites in the city proper and its environs as well as nearby cities are an integral part of the program of study.

Prerequisites

Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: ART; WCult: W

ITAL 6: Language Study Abroad: Literature

An introductory course offered in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, dealing with major figures, themes, or genres of Italian literature. Some areas of concern are critical reading and analysis, style, historical and social perspective.  Italian 6 may count toward the minor.

Prerequisites

Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 8: Exploring Italian Culture and Language

This course will serve as an introduction to modern and contemporary Italian literature, culture and society. It will focus on topics such as evolving political and regional identities, gender relations, the role of the media, and the culture of daily life, as they appear in forms as diverse as narrative and poetry, cinema, music, and journalism. Students will also focus on specific grammatical and stylistic issues in order to improve their fluency in Italian. Course work will consist of frequent essays and student-led discussions.

Prerequisites

ITAL 3 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: SOC; WCult: W

ITAL 9: Italian Culture

Italian 9 expands on the skills acquired in the Italian language sequence (Italian 1, 2, 3, and/or the LSA) as well as offering a transition to Italian 10 and our upper-division literature and culture courses. This course introduces students to modern and contemporary Italian literature, culture and society through a focus on topics such as evolving political and regional identities, gender relations, the role of the media, and the culture of daily life. Students expand their active use of Italian, refine communicative, reading, and writing strategies, and comprehensively review grammar. Course work includes active participation in class discussions, oral presentations, and regular reading and writing assignments in the areas of narrative and poetry, cinema, music, and journalism. Instructors usually choose one or several "anchor" texts around which coursework revolves.

Prerequisites

ITAL 3 or permission of the instructor.

ITAL 10: Introduction to Italian Literature: Masterworks and Great Issues

This course will offer a general introduction to Italian literature from the thirteenth century to the present. Topics will vary according to the interests of the instructor, but readings will center on such authors as Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Leopardi, Manzoni, Pirandello, and Svevo.

Prerequisites

ITAL 8 or ITAL 9, or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 12: Advanced Writing and Speaking in Italian

An advanced language and composition course in which students will work with a wide range of linguistic and cultural materials in order to achieve competence in Italian grammar, and oral and written expression.

Prerequisites

Acceptance into the Dartmouth Advanced Language Study Abroad Program

Distributive and/or World Culture

WCult: W

ITAL 15: Italian Cinema

Conducted in Italian, this course introduces students to classic Italian cinema, including its history and its predominant genres-from the silent film to comedy and melodrama and thriller. Students will become familiar with Italian cinematic movements such as Neorealism, directors such as Federico Fellini and Roberto Benigni, as well as with important concepts in film analysis.

Prerequisites

 ITAL 8 or ITAL 9, or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: ART; WCult: W

ITAL 21: Early Italian Literature and Culture

This course will offer an introduction to medieval Italian literature and culture through readings of literary masterworks of the period. The approach will be interdisciplinary: we will consider connections between literary texts and medieval art, music, philosophical currents, and historical events. Themes may include the importance of writing in the vernacular, discourses of love, conceptions of sex roles and gender, personal and political aspirations of the self in society, and the constitution of ideal forms of social organization. Readings will be selected from Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Caterina da Siena, and others.

Prerequisites

ITAL 10 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 22: Humanism and Renaissance

This course explores the extraordinary cultural production of Italy from the late fourteenth to the end of the sixteenth century—the Renaissance. Students will examine broader social and historical contexts through topics such as humanism; attitudes toward the ancient world and the “discovery” of new worlds; developments in the visual arts and in science; court society; sexuality and courtesan culture; gender and family life; religious reform. Genres considered may include essay, dialogue, political treatise, theatre, lyric and epic poetry, letters, and the novella. Authors may include Petrarch, Alberti, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Isabella di Morra, Veronica Franco, Ruzante, Castiglione, Ariosto, Bandello, and Tasso.

Prerequisites

ITAL 10 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 23: Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Italian Literature and Culture

This course explores the rich innovations that marked Italian literature and the arts over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, from the Baroque culture of crisis and change to the Enlightenment's own reassessment of earlier forms of knowledge and representation. Topics include the poetics of the marvelous, the fascination with popular culture, the nuova scienza, social class and identity, the "cult of reason," and the relevance of both Baroque and Enlightenment categories to post-modernity. We will explore traditional genres such as lyric poetry, the essay, and the novella, but also new forms: the fairy tale, women's writing, travel literature, the commedia dell'arte, the novel, and the opera. Authors and artists may include Giambattista Basile, Giambattista Marino, Galileo, Arcangela Tarabotti, Isabella Andreini, Monteverdi, Pergolesi, Bernini, Caravaggio, and Carlo Goldoni. There will also be units on books, visual arts and music, with guest lectures and visits to Rauner Special Collections and the Hood Museum.

Prerequisites

ITAL 10 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 24: Nineteenth-Century Italian Literature and Culture

This course examines the changes in literary vision and artistic forms from the beginning of the nineteenth century, through the country’s unification, to the First World War. Emphasis will be placed on Italy’s growing self-awareness as a nation and on analysis of aesthetic and intellectual issues. Particular attention will be given to popular art such as satire, cookbooks, and Verdi’s operas, and to women’s literature as an innovative cultural force. Readings may include Ugo Foscolo, Giacomo Leopardi, Alessandro Manzoni, Giovanni Verga, Marchesa Colombi, Carlo Collodi, Grazia Deledda, and F. T. Marinetti.

Prerequisites

ITAL 10 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

ITAL 25: Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Italian Literature and Culture

This course examines the radical transformation of literary form and vision that characterizes twentieth and twenty-first century Italy with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to Italian identity posed by modernization, immigration, and globalization. We will use poetry, fiction, autobiography, political writings, television, documentaries, and film to explore cultural movements such as the avant-garde and neo-realism. Particular contexts may include fascism, the resistance movements, and terrorism. Students will read canonical and non-canonical texts including, for example, recent immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Bontempelli, Moravia, Morante, Calvino, Maraini, Fellini, Tornatore, Wertmueller, and Jadelin Mabiala Gambo.

Prerequisites

ITAL 10 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 27: Topics in Italian Literature

Offerings of this course will consist of various topics in Italian literature.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist:LIT; WCult:W

ITAL 27.02: Culture and/in Translation: Theory and Practice

Human communication depends on translation. Much of what we know about worlds different from our own comes through translations and the dialogues between languages and cultures that they create.  In this course we will focus on translation between Italian and American cultures, and consider the larger question of the representation of “foreignness.” We will explore the theory and practice of translation in various contexts—literature, film, popular media—and gain direct experience in the art of translation through workshops and a final project.

Prerequisites

ITAL 10 or permission of the instructor.

Distributive and/or World Culture

Dist: LIT; WCult: W

ITAL 85: Independent Reading and Research

Students may arrange a program of study and research with individual faculty members. Open only to Italian, Italian Studies, and Romance Language Majors. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. 

ITAL 88: Senior Independent Reading and Research

A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to senior Italian, Italian Studies, and Romance Language (whose primary language is Italian) Majors. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

ITAL 89: Honors Seminar

Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in Italian, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.