Fall 2020 Courses

Fall 2020 Courses

Please note course times have changed: http://www.dartmouth.edu/reg/docs/class_schedule.pdf

Upper level courses are labeled according to topic. The general  topic appears on the registrar's site.  These courses change each term. The offering for a given term is listed in the department's website.

The course listings below have been updated as of 7/27/20. Please contact the Department Administrator, Sydney Lucia, with any questions. 

ITALIAN COURSES FALL 2020

All Italian courses (1, 2, 3, 11) will offer engaging, experiential, and communicative activities that will foster a sense of community synchronously and asynchronously.  Cultural and linguistic tasks to complete independently in small groups on-campus or remotely will enrich your learning experience. 

All French courses (1, 2, 3, 11) will offer engaging, experiential, and communicative activities synchronously and asynchronously.

FALL 2020 COURSES

Please note course times have changed: http://www.dartmouth.edu/reg/docs/class_schedule.pdf

The course listings below have been updated as of 7/27/20. Please contact the Department Administrator, Sydney Lucia, with any questions. 

ITALIAN COURSES FALL 2020

Italian 1: Introduction to Italian I at D (remote with optional on campus components), E (remote with synchronous components)

An introduction to Italian as a spoken and written language. The work includes regular practice in class and scheduled drill-sessions in understanding and using the spoken language. Written exercises and elementary reading materials serve for vocabulary building and discussion. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements

Italian 2: Introduction to Italian II at D -remote with optional on campus components and remote with synchronous components

Rapid review and continued study of the fundamentals of Italian, with intensive work in vocabulary building. The course will also include an introduction to the culture and civilization of Italy. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 1. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Italian 3: Intermediate Italian at E - remote with optional on campus components and remote with synchronous components

Given on-campus as the final course in the required sequence and off-campus as part of the L.S.A. curriculum, this course is designed to develop reading, writing, and speaking skills, with emphasis on expansion of vocabulary and reinforcement of grammatical structures. Some discussion of texts and films of literary or cultural interest. Frequent oral and written assignments and tests, both on-campus and off, plus daily drills off-campus. Open to students by qualifying test or to students who have passed Italian 2. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Italian 11: Intensive Italian (Benvegnù) at D - remote with optional on campus components and remote with synchronous components 

This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied Italian for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to Italian through family ties or have spent some time in an Italian-speaking environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French,  Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  Italian 11 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn Italian. 

Italian 9: Advanced Italian Culture (Convertini) at ARR

This course will serve to an introduction to Modern and contemporary Italian culture and society as preparation for future study of Italian language, literature, film and culture at more advanced levels. Through comprehensive grammar review and focus on specific stylistic issues, you will improve your language fluency and your command of spoken and written Italian. 

This iteration of the course will be delivered remotely with synchronous components. This means you will do some of the work asynchronously, but will also able to build a sense of community thanks to our remote class meetings. Through the viewing of the film La meglio gioventù (2003), facilitated discussion, blogs, and hands on creative tasks, you will improve your use of language, while learning about Italian civilization and culture.

Italian 14: Introduction to Italian Culture (Convertini) at J - remote with synchronous components

Have you ever wondered what makes people fall in love with Italy? From history, the arts, religion, and gastronomy to science, technology, and "Made in Italy," Italian culture will come alive in this course as you learn how to critically read and discuss cultural texts and artifacts while also gaining an understanding of the global impact of Italian cultural production across time and space. Expect to be highly engaged through lectures, discussions, and hands-on projects. In many units, guest lecturers will broaden the discussion about Italian cultural production from a variety of perspectives. The 2020-21 iteration of the ourse will be delivered in a hybrid format, meaning that will be available both to students on campus and remotely. 

Through a series of synchronous and asynchronous activities, you will discover the richness and complexity of Italian culture. Through your interaction with the class, on an individual level, through groupwork, and facilitated discussion, you will engage with intellectual inquiry, critical and creative thinking and content creation, regardless of whether you attend the class F2F or remotely. 

Please note: Time period is J, but we will use only one hour of that time slot for synchronous meetings. 

 

ITAL 33:01: Into and Beyond Dante's Inferno (Callegari) at K - remote with synchronous components. 

The work of Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) stages from beginning to end a struggle between personal desire, social obligation, and the conflicting cultures of Christian religion and the body politic. The unprecedented fusion Dante made of these elements in the Commedia [The Divine Comedy] has guaranteed his great poem a vast public, extending across world cultures and the seven centuries since it initially traveled among elite readers in north-central Italy in the early decades of the fourteenth century. This course will first examine the development of Dante's poetic voice in La vita nova [The New Life, ca. 1293-94] and then focus on its subsequent expansion into an all-encompassing vision of life and death in Inferno [Hell, ca. 1306-09], the first of the three canticles of the Commedia

Italian 88: Senior Independent Reading and Research (Arrange, all terms) 

A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to senior Italian, Italian Studies, and Romance Language (whose primary language is Italian) Majors. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

Italian 89: Honors Seminar (Arrange, all terms)

Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in Italian, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

 

FRENCH COURSES FALL 2020

French 1: Introductory French I at C (remote with on campus components) and F (remote with synchronous components)

French 2: Introductory French II at E (remote with on campus components) and D, F (remote with synchronous components)

French 3: Introductory French III at F (remote with on campus components) and C, D, E (remote with synchronous components)

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language (Mefoude-Obiono) at E - remote with synchronous components.

Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.17: Saints, Martyrs, and Demons (Hollister) at D - remote with synchronous components.

Many of French fiction's most iconic characters have been marked as holy or unholy, saintly or damned. This course will ask what the famous saints, martyrs and demons of French cultural history have to say about morality, politics, and social issues (notably class, gender, race, and sexuality). Works by Racine, Voltaire, Sade, Diderot, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Eluard, Aragon, Bataille, Sartre, Barthes, Clouzot, Bresson, Césaire, and Yourcenar.

French 55: French Culture and Politics 

  • French 55.06 Politics and Intellectuals (Kritzman) at J - remote with synchronous components. 

The modern intellectual was invented in France at the time of the Dreyfus affair. In the twentieth century, French intellectuals were seen as moral guides and social critics. They engaged in philosophical speculations by bridging theory with practice. During political crises, intellectuals engaged in public debate as a means of influencing society. We will examine figures such as Zola, Benda, Breton, Sartre, Camus, Beauvoir, Aron, Foucault, Ben Jelloun, Derrida , Bourdieu, and Kristeva.

French 80: Gastronomie en France *counts toward pre-19th century requirement for major/minor* (Beasley) at K - remote with synchronous components

If you have taken French 10 and are experiencing technical difficulties enrolling in French 80 please email Faith.Beasley@Dartmouth.edu

Over the past 300 years the world has come to associate France with the gastronomic arts. In 2010 UNESCO named "le repas gastronomique des Français" to its list of the world's "intangible cultural heritage" sites.  This "meal" is much more than the food that is served.  It is an art form that engages all five senses.  We will explore the origins of French gastronomy and how France's relationship to food culture became an art and model for the world.  Particular attention will be paid to the way that words create, reflect, and transmit this art in France and to the world.     

This course is one of the two offered in 20-21 that counts toward the pre-19th century requirement for majors/minors. It can also serve as a subsitution for French 22 or 23 with permission from Professor Beasley. Please contact her with any questions about this course.

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms)

A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms)

Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.