2023-2024 Italian Courses

2023-2024 Italian Courses

FALL 2023 COURSES

Discover our Italian courses featuring innovative pedagogy, engaging experiential activities, and a deep sense of community. Embark on a learning journey that's not just about acquiring words and grammar. No matter your future career direction, Italian will enrich your experience with newly developed soft skills, intercultural sensitivity, and a global perspective. Join our welcoming and diverse community of faculty and students, where everyone is unique, heard, and valued.

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Italian 1: 3 sections--Ciniglia @ 10, D'Angelo @ 11 and Alberti @ 12-An introduction to Italian as a spoken and written language, with emphasis on practical conversation. The course includes regular practice in class and scheduled drill-sessions in understanding and using the spoken language. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. 

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Italian 2: 1 section--D'Angelo @ 10-Rapid review and continued study of the fundamentals of Italian, with intensive work in vocabulary building. The course will also include an introduction to the culture and civilization of Italy. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 1. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

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Italian 3:  2 sections--Alberti @ 10 and Ciniglia @ 11: This course is designed to reinforce and refine spoken and written language skills through a review of grammar, exposure to a broad spectrum of language ranging from colloquial to literary styles, and the use of samples of Italian language from multiple sources such as advertising, comics, television and literature. Frequent compositions, quizzes, plus linguistic and thematic analysis of texts. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 2 or ARTH 12. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

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Italian 11: 1 section-- Gilebbi @ 12: This 1-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French, Rumanian, Portuguese, Catalan, or Latin). Italian 11 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 1 and 2 in one term offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere to learn Italian. The course will have a hybrid component, that through cultural, grammar and multimedia introductory exercises will prepare students for the in-class activities. In this course, students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for Italian 3 or apply for our Italian LSA in Rome. With the goal to facilitate the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in Italian.  

*from ZERO to CONVERSATION in 10 WEEKS!*

This course is perfect for students who speak another Romance language. If you graduate in 2026, and you have already taken a language up to level 3, the course will satisfy the language requirement. 

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Italian 9: 1 section Gilebbi @ 11-Advanced Language Through Culture expands on the skills acquired in the Italian language sequence (Italian 1, 2, 3, and/or the LSA) as well as offering a transition to Italian 10 and our upper-division literature and culture courses. This course introduces students to modern and contemporary Italian literature, culture and society through a focus on topics such as evolving political and regional identities, gender relations, the role of the media, and the culture of daily life. Students expand their active use of Italian, refine communicative, reading, and writing strategies, and comprehensively review grammar. Course work includes active participation in class discussions, oral presentations, and regular reading and writing assignments in the areas of narrative and poetry, cinema, music, and journalism. Instructors usually choose one or several "anchor" texts around which coursework revolves.  NRO eligible

Italian 33.01-Callegari @ 11: Dante:The Divine Comedy; The work of Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) stages from beginning to end a struggle between personal desire, social obligation, and the conflicting cultures of Christian religion and the body politic. The unprecedented fusion Dante made of these elements in the Commedia [The Divine Comedy] has guaranteed his great poem a vast public, extending across world cultures and the seven centuries since it initially traveled among elite readers in north-central Italy in the early decades of the fourteenth century. This course will first examine the development of Dante's poetic voice in La vita nova [The New Life, ca. 1293-94] and then focus on its subsequent expansion into an all-encompassing vision of life and death in Inferno [Hell, ca. 1306-09], the first of the three canticles of the Commedia. Situating Dante in his own time and place will be essential to our analysis of his poetry, but attention to the multiple ways that Dante's work has been interpreted, translated, and appropriated in other periods, languages, and media will provide a critical framework for understanding its enduring appeal, why – in the words of Italo Calvino – it "has not finished saying what it has to say." Readings, lectures, discussion, and written work – to include a mid-term exam, two short essays, and a final digital project – will be in English. Students taking the course for major or minor credit will attend a weekly X-hour and write the two essays in Italian.  NRO eligible. 

Italian 35.02-Parati @ 2: How to Be a Fascist; How do people become fascists?  How do they rise to power? Why did people support fascism? We will focus initially on the original model for fascist dictatorships, that is Italian fascism, but we will also have in-class presentations by Dartmouth professors on German, Spanish, French and Japanese forms of fascism.  This is a course that will concentrate on history, film, literature, and fashion in order to talk about the slippery definitions of fascism.   NRO eligible. 

 

Winter 2024

Italian 1:  2 sections-Alberti @ 11 and Ciniglia @ 10: An introduction to Italian as a spoken and written language, with emphasis on practical conversation. The course includes regular practice in class and scheduled drill-sessions in understanding and using the spoken language. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. 

Italian 2:  3 sections-Alberti @ 12 and Perego @10: Rapid review and continued study of the fundamentals of Italian, with intensive work in vocabulary building. The course will also include an introduction to the culture and civilization of Italy. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 1. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Italian 3:  1 section-Ciniglia @ 11: This course is designed to reinforce and refine spoken and written language skills through a review of grammar, exposure to a broad spectrum of language ranging from colloquial to literary styles, and the use of samples of Italian language from multiple sources such as advertising, comics, television and literature. Frequent compositions, quizzes, plus linguistic and thematic analysis of texts. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 2 or ARTH 12. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Italian 9:  1 section-Convertini-10:  Advanced Language Through Culture expands on the skills acquired in the Italian language sequence (Italian 1, 2, 3, and/or the LSA) as well as offering a transition to Italian 10 and our upper-division literature and culture courses. This course introduces students to modern and contemporary Italian literature, culture and society through a focus on topics such as evolving political and regional identities, gender relations, the role of the media, and the culture of daily life. Students expand their active use of Italian, refine communicative, reading, and writing strategies, and comprehensively review grammar. Course work includes active participation in class discussions, oral presentations, and regular reading and writing assignments in the areas of narrative and poetry, cinema, music, and journalism. Instructors usually choose one or several "anchor" texts around which coursework revolves.  NRO eligible

Italian 14: Convertini @ 11: Journey to Italy: An Introduction to Italian Culture:  This course introduces students to Italian culture through a representative selection of texts and topics from past to present, as well as encouraging students to think critically about notions of culture and identity. Topics include stereotypes and the idea of national identity, modern history, society and politics, food culture, the visual arts, music, cinema, religion, science and technology, the environment, Made in Italy, immigration, sports, and mafia.  In many units, guest lecturers will widen the discussion by considering the global impact of Italian cultural production across time and space. Students will actively engage with Italian cultural phenomena through in-class lectures and discussions, hands-on exercises, and site visits.   Dist:SOC; WCult:CI

Italian 21: Medieval & Renaissance Italy-Wyatt-TBD

Italian 35.01:  From Dagos to Sopranos-Parati @ 2:  Are Italians white? Where does the word "dago" come from? What is "dago red"? Can Italians be "Afrocentrists"? Are Italians racist? What do you know about the mafia? These and other questions will be at the center of this course. We will also work on the portrayal of ItalianAmericanness in "The Sopranos," "The Godfather," and Jim   "Ghost Dog." The last week of the course will be devoted to the music by Italian Americans such as Sinatra and Madonna.  Open to all students. Text, lectures and discussion in English. Students taking the course for major or minor credit in Italian will attend a weekly x-hour and do all written work in Italian.  XL with COLT 57.02.  Dist:LIT; :CI

FRIT 37.04: Canepa @ 10:  European Fairy Tales:  In this course we will study the evolution of the forms and contents of the rich European fairy-tale tradition, from the Renaissance to our times. Along the way we will address questions concerning canon formation; the role of "marvelous" genres such as the fairy tale in socialization and the expression of national identity; the relation between oral folk narratives and written literary tales; and the reworking of fairy-tale subjects and motifs in contemporary culture. We will also acquaint ourselves with a variety of critical approaches to the fairy tale, and create tales of our own. Cross Listed Courses: COLT 39.03. Dist:LIT; WCult:W

LSA/LSA+:  Gilebbi-Rome

 

Spring 2024

Italian 1:  1 section-Ciniglia @ TBD:  An introduction to Italian as a spoken and written language, with emphasis on practical conversation. The course includes regular practice in class and scheduled drill-sessions in understanding and using the spoken language. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. 

Italian 2:  1 section-Ciniglia-TBD: Rapid review and continued study of the fundamentals of Italian, with intensive work in vocabulary building. The course will also include an introduction to the culture and civilization of Italy. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 1. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Italian 3:  3 sections-Convertini @ TBD and Alberti 2 sections@TBD:  This course is designed to reinforce and refine spoken and written language skills through a review of grammar, exposure to a broad spectrum of language ranging from colloquial to literary styles, and the use of samples of Italian language from multiple sources such as advertising, comics, television and literature. Frequent compositions, quizzes, plus linguistic and thematic analysis of texts. Open to students by qualifying placement or to students who have passed ITAL 2 or ARTH 12. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Italian 11: Gilebbi @ TBD:  This 1-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French, Rumanian, Portuguese, Catalan, or Latin). Italian 11 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 1 and 2 in one term offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere to learn Italian. The course will have a hybrid component, that through cultural, grammar and multimedia introductory exercises will prepare students for the in-class activities. In this course, students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for Italian 3 or apply for our Italian LSA in Rome. With the goal to facilitate the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in Italian.  

Italian 10.03:  Italian Disaster Narratives-Parati @ 11:  This course is an exciting introduction to Italian Literature and culture. This iteration of the course focuses on "Disasters?: Migration and exile"  and will cover a number of centuries. We will start with Dante and exile, move to Marco Polo, Christopher Columbus, and then focus on political exile to northern Europe and the United States in the 19th century and on nation building. We will also read Amalia Nizzoli's autobiographical narrative of her life in Egypt and her meetings with harem women. The course will conclude with a selection of 20th and 21st century novels and films on migrations to Italy, on diversity, and recent Italian transformations. The goal is to learn about Italian culture, history, and literature. We can develop your reading, speaking, and writing skills in Italian in this class.  W DIST. 

Italian 37.10:  Mafias-Canepa-10:  What is "mafia"? Organized crime, global big business, shadow state, deeply entrenched mentalities, glamorized myth, all of the above? This course focusses on Italian mafias (primarily the Sicilian Cosa Nostra) and, to a lesser degree, other Italian and Italian-American mafias. We will examine the conditions in which mafias emerged; those that make it possible for mafias to continue to thrive today; the social "codes" of the mafias, such as honor, omertà, and vendetta; and the forms that mafias take in the collective cultural imagination, in particular as they have been translated and represented in fiction and film on both sides of the Atlantic. In the process, we will explore Italian history and contemporary society and discuss topics such as the uses and abuses of power and the attraction of outlaw cultures. This course is not open to students who have received credit for ITAL 07.07.  Cross Listed Courses: COLT 57.12. Dist:INT or SOC; WCult:W

Italian 26:  Italian Cinema: Parati @ 2:  Conducted in Italian, this course introduces students to classic Italian cinema, including its history and its predominant genres-from the silent film to comedy and melodrama and thriller. Students will become familiar with Italian cinematic movements such as Neorealism, directors such as Federico Fellini and Roberto Benigni, as well as with important concepts in film analysis. Not open to students who have received credit for ITAL 26.  Dist:ART; WCult:W

FRIT 31:  How Languages are Learned- Convertini @ TBD:  Many approaches to language teaching and learning have been proposed and implemented over time. From learning grammar rules and lists of vocabulary to memorization and practice of correct sentences to natural communication, project work, communicative language teaching, and content-based learning, this course will introduce students to some of the language acquisition research that will help them understand how languages are learned. Topics explored in the course will include language awareness, bilingualism, early-child language learning, the major trends in twentieth-century language teaching, and the role of technology in language learning. The course will also offer students the opportunity to reflect on language learning on a personallevel, to find out how they think as language learners and how they can empower themselves to learn languages in an active andengaged manner. Hands-on activities, including class observations, textbook evaluations, and interviews with language learners, will complement the course. Open to all students. Text, lectures, and discussion in English. Students taking the course for major or minor credit in Italian will attend a weekly x-hour and do all written work in Italian. Not open to students who have received credit for FRIT 093.  Dist:SOC; Lang:LRP