2020-21 French Courses

2020-21

SUMMER 2020 FRENCH COURSES

French 3: Introductory French III @ ARR (McConnell)

French 8: Exploring French Language and Culture @ ARR (McConnell)  Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 10.19: À la recherce du bonheur @ 10A*see note below* (Beasley): The events of the past few months in particular have led many of us to reflect on what constitutes happiness and what makes us as individuals truly happy.  In this course we will enter into dialogue with French writers and thinkers who have long been attracted to this subject.  We will explore happiness from all angles and across centuries.  Has the concept of happiness changed from the Middle Ages to the present?  How have authors written about le bonheur?  Why have they chosen this subject?  Is there anything particular about bonheur in the French context? 

This course was first offered in winter 2020. Over the spring term it was adapted for an online format.  There will be some asynchronous work, but for the most part we will meet as we would have if the course were being held on campus.  This is a discussion based course that will enable you to improve your spoken and written French, as we create a conversation with the past and present and construct our own interpretations of this fundamental concept.

* This course is scheduled at the 10A time slot.  The course will, however, be both synchronous and asynchronous given the current situation.  Students should plan to dedicate the 10A slot to this course, although we may not meet synchronously for the full time allotted every Tuesday and Thursday.*

French 40.04: Classical Comedy: Molière @ 2A *see note below* (Beasley): Molière is France's best known and most universally loved playwright.  Over three hundred years after his death, his plays continue to dominate the French stage and stages across the world.  In this course, we will explore Molière's creative genius to understand his profound and lasting influence.  This course has been redesigned for the summer 2020  online offering.  Some of the questions we will explore asynchronously but primarily synchronously are:  What was and is the role of theatre in society?  Why is Molière so important to French culture?  How was a play staged in 17th-century France?  How have the staging of Molière's plays changed over time?  What is the relationship between politics and theatre?  What is comedy? How did the public experience Molière's comedy?  In addition to studying French theatre and its history, we will create our own theatre troupe. 

*This course is scheduled at the 2A time slot.  The course will, however, be both synchronous and asynchronous given the current situation.  Students should plan to dedicate the 2A slot to this course, although we may not meet synchronously for the full time allotted every Tuesday and Thursday.*

2020-21

FALL 2020 FRENCH COURSES

French 1: Introductory French I at 9L, 10

French 2: Introductory French II at 9L, 10, 11

French 3: Introductory French III at 10, 10, 10, 11


French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language at 10 (Mefoude Obiono) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.06: The Anatomy of Passion at 2 (Walker): A study of passion in French and francophone literature through the ages, as seen through texts and films. Readings may include works by Sceve, Corneille, Laclos, Flaubert, Condé
  • French 10.17: Saints, Martyrs, and Demons at 10 (Hollister): Many of French fiction's most iconic characters have been marked as holy or unholy, saintly or damned. This course will ask what the famous saints, martyrs and demons of French cultural history have to say about morality, politics, and social issues (notably class, gender, race, and sexuality). Works by Racine, Voltaire, Sade, Diderot, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Eluard, Aragon, Bataille, Sartre, Barthes, Clouzot, Bresson, Césaire, and Yourcenar.

French 25: Introduction to French Literature & Culture - 20th and 21st Centuries at 11 (Hollister): This course examines the radical transformations of literary form and vision that characterize twentieth-century France with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to French identity posed by immigration and globalization. We will use lyric poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and film to explore literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the new novel, the theater of the absurd and écriture féminine, as well as the recent impact of immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Proust, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Delbo, Cixous, Sebbar, Resnais, Malle, and Kassovitz.

French 55: French Culture and Politics 

  • French 55.06 Politics and Intellectuals at 10A (Kritzman): The modern intellectual was invented in France at the time of the Dreyfus affair. In the twentieth century, French intellectuals were seen as moral guides and social critics. They engaged in philosophical speculations by bridging theory with practice. During political crises, intellectuals engaged in public debate as a means of influencing society. We will examine figures such as Zola, Benda, Breton, Sartre, Camus, Beauvoir, Aron, Foucault, Ben Jelloun, Derrida , Bourdieu, and Kristeva.

French 70: Francophone Literature

  • French 70.03 Passages and Ambiguous Adventures: Colonial and Postcolonial Questions of Migration and Immigration at 11 (Walker): A comparative study of urban and globalized Francophone cultures (Port-au-Prince, Dakar, Algiers, Tangiers, Saigon, Brussels, Paris), the attendant challenges and effects of globalization, including immigration, national politics, gender, sexuality, as well as ecology and economics, and how the literary or filmic imagination captures these issues. Readings by Kane, Sembène, Beyala; Lê, Lefèvre; ben Jelloun, Allouache, Chraibi; Chauvet, Ollivier, Étienne, Césaire, Glissant.

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

FSP in Paris (LaGuardia)

 

Updated 4/27/20

2020-21

WINTER 2021 FRENCH COURSES

French 1: Introductory French I at 9L

French 2: Introductory French II at 9L, 10, 11

French 3: Introductory French III at 9L, 10

French 11: Intensive French at 10 (Lerme): This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. The course will have a web-based component, which, through cultural, grammar and multimedia learning activities, will complement face-to-face work and prepare students for in-class work. Students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course, making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for French 3 or apply for our French LSAs in Lyon or Toulouse. With the goal of facilitating the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in French.

 

French 7: First Year Seminar at TBD (Sanders)


French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language at 10 (McConnell) and 11 (Mefoude Obiono): Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 15: The Language and Culture of French Musiness at 10 (Mosenthal): This course will prepare students to work in a French business environment, while at the same time help them develop a global mindset and intercultural sensitivity. The aim of the course is not only to give students specific vocabulary with an application of language skills to business situations and contexts, but also to analyze how French politics, economic history and culture have resulted in current business practices in France. Students will acquire an in-depth understanding of cultural differences in the world of work between France and the USA.  Thus, the impact of this course is not only communicative competence through learning business French – but also cross-cultural agility, aptitude and awareness.

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.XX at TBD (St. Clair)

 

French 24: Introduction to French Literature and Culture III: Nineteenth Century at TBD (St. Clair): This course examines the nineteenth-century renewal of literary form and vision from the French Revolution to the First World War. We will study the social and historical developments of French culture as they are reflected in various literary genres (narrative, poetry, dramatic theory and practice), literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and the other arts. Emphasis will be placed on France's growing self-awareness as a nation and on the analysis of aesthetic and intellectual issues represented in the major literary movements of this period including romanticism, realism, symbolism, art for art's sake, naturalism, fin de siècle decadence, and modernism. Readings may include works by such authors as Chateaubriand, de Staël, Stendhal, Hugo, Musset, Sand, Balzac, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Michelet, Zola, and Huysmans.

French 45: Dartmouth meets the French Enlightenment at TBD (Sanders)

French 53: French Thought: Philosophical Issues

  • French 53.09: The Paris School of Existentialism at 10A (Kritzman)

French 78: Senior Major Workshop at TBD (Walker)  As part of this culminating experience, each major will work on an independent project, either a senior thesis or expanding upon work begun in a previous course. The independent project will be developed within the framework of this course using a selection of critical texts that can be viewed as models of literary, cultural, and historical analysis. Lectures by a variety of faculty members will supplement the readings. Students will gain mastery in literary and cultural analysis, close analytical reading skills and composition in French.  French 78 may be used to continue research on your honors thesis.  This course is open only to French and Italian Department senior majors or by petition, which is due by the fifth day of classes of Fall term.

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

LSA/LSA+ in Lyon (Elhariry)

FSP in Paris (Beasley)

 

Updated 4/27/20

2020-21

SPRING 2021 FRENCH COURSES

French 1: Introductory French I at 9L

French 2: Introductory French II at 9L, 10

French 3: Introductory French III at 9L (Sanders), 10, 11

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language at TBD (Hollister) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8. Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 15: Business French and the French Economy at 10 (Mosenthal)  This course will enable students to function in a French business environment. We will use departments of a company (human resources, production, sales, finance and administration) to acquire a knowledge of business terminology and practices. Using company web sites and the business press, students will become familiar with important companies and the environment in which they operate.  NOTE: This course does not count toward the major or the minor. Upon completion of this course, students may take the exam for the DFP (Diplôme de Français Professionnel - Français des Affaires).

French 10: Introduction to French Literature

  • French 10.XX at TBD (St. Clair)  

French 20: Interpreting French Cultures at TBD (Sanders): Students will acquire the analytical skills to interpret French and Francophone cultures.  To prepare students to be "culturally competent," the course will focus on how and why we read signs of culture, whether through the lenses of history, symbols, politics or class and power.  We will explore a variety of cultural objects in conjunction with the writings of authors who may include Balibar, Barthes, Baudrillard, Condé, Fanon, Foucault, Le Goff, Nora and Wieviorka.

French 25Introductioin to French Literature and Culture: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries at TBD (Hollister): This course examines the radical transformations of literary form and vision that characterize twentieth-century France with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to French identity posed by immigration and globalization. We will use lyric poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and film to explore literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the new novel, the theater of the absurd and écriture féminine, as well as the recent impact of immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Proust, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Delbo, Cixous, Sebbar, Resnais, Malle, and Kassovitz

French 40.02: French and Francophone Poetry from Baudelaire through Cesaire at TBD (Elhariry): Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Guillaume Apollinaire, Paul Eluard, André Breton, Paul Valéry, Aimé Césaire, Léon Damas, D.T. Niane and Andrée Chedid are poets of radically different backgrounds connected by abiding preoccupations of a modernist vision. These poets will be studied in order to explore the traditions and counter-traditions of French and Francophone poetry.  

French 50: French Literature: Major Figures

  • French 50.XX: Reading Modernity for Filth: Baudelaire/Flaubert at TBD (St. Clair)

French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

FSP in Paris (Wine)

LSA/LSA+ in Toulouse (TBD)