2021-2022 French Courses

Scheduling Note

This page was updated on 3/8/21 and is subject to change. 

SUMMER 2021 FRENCH COURSES

French 3: Introductory French III at C (McConnell)

French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language at D (McConnell) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 10.19: A la recherche du bonheur at J (Beasley): What is happiness?  How has this concept changed over the centuries?  How has its conception and treatment been influenced by social events, gender, and class?  Is there a form of happiness that is particularly French?  In this course we will explore such questions using texts from the Middle Ages to the 21st century and study the role that the quest for happiness has played in French culture.  Dist:LIT WCULT:W

French 25: Introduction to French Literature and Culture IV: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries at C (Hollister): This course examines the radical transformations of literary form and vision that characterize twentieth-century France with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to French identity posed by immigration and globalization. We will use lyric poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and film to explore literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the new novel, the theater of the absurd and écriture féminine, as well as the recent impact of immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Proust, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Delbo, Cixous, Sebbar, Resnais, Malle, and Kassovitz.

French 80: Culture and Cuisine: L'Art de la Gastronomie at K (Beasley): Over the past 300 years the world has come to associate France with the gastronomic arts. In 2010 UNESCO named "le repas gastronomique des Français" to its list of the world's "intangible cultural heritage" sites.  This "meal" is much more than the food that is served.  It is an art form that engages all five senses.  We will explore the origins of French gastronomy and how France's relationship to food culture became an art and model for the world.  Particular attention will be paid to the way that words create, reflect, and transmit this art in France and to the world.     

If you have taken French 10 and are experiencing technical difficulties enrolling in French 80 please email Faith.Beasley@Dartmouth.edu. This course counts toward the pre-19th century requirement for majors/minors. It can also serve as a subsitution for French 22 or 23 with permission from Professor Beasley. Please contact her with any questions about this course.

      FALL 2021 FRENCH COURSES

      French 1: Introductory French I @ TBD 2 sections

      French 2: Introductory French II @ TBD 3 sections

      French 3: Introductory French III @ TBD 2 sections

      French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language @ TBD Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

      French 10: Introduction to French Literature

      • French 10.08: Living in Paris/Habiter à Paris at TBD (LaGuardia): Living in Paris has generated an enormous amount of writing since the middle ages. This course will examine diverse narrative, poetic, propagandistic, memorial, historical, and anthropological texts that describe the difficulties and the joys of living in the French capital. Works by Perec, L'Estoile, Prévost, Baudelaire, Mercier, Sue, Balzac, Augé, Modiano, Colette, Barthes, Gary, Duras, and others.
      • French 10.10 Du Mal @ TBD (St. Clair) This course proposes a look at "evil" in French literature, art, and film (1665-1966). What does "evil" designate? A concept, or an ethical category?  A limit of the thinkable and sayable? The proof of human freedom? Is there a semiotics of evil? Can it be represented, or does its excess necessarily elude our attempts to pin it down (as when something "hurts," or "fait mal")? What is its relationship to the violence of history (from the death of God to the ravages of time passing by)? How does literature challenge us to think about what it means to be a witness to evil?  Plays by Molière; novels, short-stories or essays by Voltaire, Balzac, Maupassant, Sartre; poems by Baudelaire, Musset, Verlaine, Hugo, Louise Michel; paintings and caricature by Daumier, Caillebotte, Manet, Meissonnier. Film by Gillo Pontecorvo (La Bataille d'Alger). Excerpts of readings from Hannah Arendt, Terry Eagleton, Georges Bataille, Raymond Williams, Sigmund Freud, Cathy Caruth. DIST:LIT; WCult:W

      French 24: Introduction to French Literature and Culture III: 19th Century at TBD (St. Clair): This course examines the nineteenth-century renewal of literary form and vision from the French Revolution to the First World War. We will study the social and historical developments of French culture as they are reflected in various literary genres (narrative, poetry, dramatic theory and practice), literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and the other arts. Emphasis will be placed on France's growing self-awareness as a nation and on the analysis of aesthetic and intellectual issues represented in the major literary movements of this period including romanticism, realism, symbolism, art for art's sake, naturalism, fin de siècle decadence, and modernism. Readings may include works by such authors as Chateaubriand, de Staël, Stendhal, Hugo, Musset, Sand, Balzac, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Michelet, Zola, and Huysmans.

      French 40.06: Selfies: Autobiographie, autoportrair, autofiction at TBD (Kritzman): A study of three forms of writing about the self and their generic distinctions. Autobiography, a practice of self-understanding deals with the construction of one's life story across time; self-portraiture does not attempt to rejoin the past by the construction of a self that is temporally constructed. The autoportraitist presents a self apprehended in the present of writing through a montage of disparate images. Autofiction, on the other hand,  deals with a form of fictionalized autobiography that uses fiction in the service of the search for self.  Subjects to be examined include: rhetoric, politics, history, and gender.  Texts: Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Sartre, Beauvoir (autobiographies,); Montaigne, Sevigne, Barthes (autoportraits);  Colette, Modiano, Ernaux (autofictions).

      French 70.02: Francophone Literature at TBD (Elhariry): This course will involve the study of Francophone literature outside Europe. This may include the literature of Africa, the Caribbean, Québec and Southeast Asia. A comparative study of urban and globalized Francophone cultures (Port-au-Prince, Dakar, Algiers, Tangiers, Saigon, Brussels, Paris), the attendant challenges and effects of globalization, including immigration, national politics, gender, sexuality, as well as ecology and economics, and how the literary or filmic imagination captures these issues. Readings by Kane, Sembène, Beyala; Lê, Lefèvre; ben Jelloun, Allouache, Chraibi; Chauvet, Ollivier, Étienne, Césaire, Glissant. Walker.

      French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

      French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

       

      WINTER 2022 FRENCH COURSES

       

      French 1: Introductory French I at TBD 2 sections

      French 2: Introductory French II at 3 sections

      French 3: Introductory French III at 2 sections

      French 7: First Year Seminar @ TBD (Kane)

      French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language at TBD: Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

      French 10: Introduction to French Literature at TBD (Sanders)

      French 20: Interpreting French Cultures at TBD (Beasley) Students will acquire the analytical skills to interpret French and Francophone cultures.  To prepare students to be "culturally competent," the course will focus on how and why we read signs of culture, whether through the lenses of history, symbols, politics or class and power.  We will explore a variety of cultural objects in conjunction with the writings of authors who may include Balibar, Barthes, Baudrillard, Condé, Fanon, Foucault, Le Goff, Nora and Wieviorka. Dist:SOC; WCult:W

      French 23:  Introduction to French Literature II: Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century @ TBD (Sanders): The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were a dynamic and volatile period characterized on the one hand by the rise to power of the most absolute of all monarchs, the Sun King Louis XIV, symbolized by Versailles, and on the other hand by the French Revolution. Fostered by royal patronage, literature and the arts flourished, yet many writers also used artistic expression to counter this royal power. The period saw the birth of the modern French novel and the development of a rich body of theatrical and philosophical literature. These centuries are recognized as major components of France's collective identity and their influence is still felt in France today. Authors may include Descartes, Corneille, Racine, Molière, Lafayette, Diderot, Rousseau, Voltaire, Graffigny, Beaumarchais and Laclos. Dist:LIT; WCult:W

      French 53.01: French Thought - Philosophical Issues (Kritzman) at TBD: This course will study texts which have shaped influential views of human nature, scientific knowledge, social and moral values. Its focus may be on the philosophers and moralists of the classical period (such as Pascal and La Rochefoucauld), the social and political thinkers of the Enlightenment (Diderot and Rousseau) or contemporary thinkers (Beauvoir, Foucault, Lévi-Strauss).

      French 78: Senior Major Workshop @ TBD (Beasley)  As part of this culminating experience, each major will work on an independent project, either a senior thesis or expanding upon work begun in a previous course. The independent project will be developed within the framework of this course using a selection of critical texts that can be viewed as models of literary, cultural, and historical analysis. Lectures by a variety of faculty members will supplement the readings. Students will gain mastery in literary and cultural analysis, close analytical reading skills and composition in French.  French 78 may be used to continue research on your honors thesis.  This course is open only to French and Italian Department senior majors or by petition, which is due by the fifth day of classes of Fall term.

      French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

      French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

       

      LSA+ Toulouse (Elhariry)

      FSP Paris (Tarnowski)

       

       

       

      SPRING 2022 FRENCH COURSES

      French 1: Introductory French I @ TBD 1 section

      French 2: Introductory French II @ TBD 2 sections

      French 3: Introductory French III @ TBD 2 sections

      French 11: Intensive French at TBD: This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. The course will have a web-based component, which, through cultural, grammar and multimedia learning activities, will complement face-to-face work and prepare students for in-class work. Students will learn to talk about familiar events in the present and the past, as well as formulate plans for the future. Weekly cultural videos will situate in context the grammatical content of the course, making it relevant and meaningful. Students will be actively engaged in a variety of creative written and oral activities that will help them develop their language skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to sign up for French 3 or apply for our French LSAs in Lyon or Toulouse. With the goal of facilitating the acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in French.

      French 8: Exploring French Culture and Language @ TBD (Wine, Sanders) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8. Dist:SOC; WCult:W

      French 10.22: Du tragique @ TBD (St. Clair): This module of FR10 proposes a study of tragedy in French literature, from classical theatre and poetry to the modern novel and film that explores tragedy as a mode of representation for the following aesthetic, political, and philosophical dilemmas/questions: in what circumstances is suffering meaningful? Is the relationship to the past (where curses, warnings, and prophecies are uttered and ghosts lie waiting) always invariably tragic? Does the law (or the State) produce tragedy? In what ways are affects or states of dispossession such as mourning and rage at the heart of tragedy? What does the tragic teach us about the relationship between contingency and destiny, between our capacity as agents to act and the unforeseeable, unpredictable consequences of our actions, about our desire to experience sympathy or even solidarity with those who find themselves falling outside of the bounds of social and symbolic order?

      French 15: The Language and Culture of French Business at TBD: This course will prepare students to work in a French business environment, while at the same time help them develop a global mindset and intercultural sensitivity. The aim of the course is not only to give students specific vocabulary with an application of language skills to business situations and contexts, but also to analyze how French politics, economic history and culture have resulted in current business practices in France. Students will acquire an in-depth understanding of cultural differences in the world of work between France and the USA.  Thus, the impact of this course is not only communicative competence through learning business French – but also cross-cultural agility, aptitude and awareness.

      French 21: Introduction to Francophone Literature and Culture at TBD (Elhariry): This course surveys the evolution of French language (Francophone) literature of the former French colonies and examines the social, political, and cultural issues it raises: race, colonialism, decolonization, revolution, independence, neo-colonialism, Négritude, Antillanité, Créolité, écriture féminine, mimetic desire, cultural hybridity, post-independence government and society. The survey will include novels, plays, poetry, film and essays by representative writers from the principal divisions of the Francophone world: the French West Indies, the Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa; Quebec, and Francophone Canada.

        French 22: Introduction to French Literature I: The Middle Ages and the Renaissance @ TBD (Tarnowski) France - its art, architecture, technology, philosophy and literature - exerted an unparalleled influence throughout Europe. Studying the first texts written in French, as well as the manuscripts in which they circulated, will shed light on the nature of French culture. We will examine defining issues of the period: the transition from oral to written expression, the invention of printing, debates concerning the status of women, Renaissance humanism, scientific inquiry, religious reform and conflict. Texts may include La Chanson de Roland, selected poetry, and works by Chrétien de Troyes, Christine de Pizan, Marguerite de Navarre, François Rabelais, and Michel de Montaigne. Dist:LIT: WCULT:W

        French 40.02: Classical Comedy: Molière at TBD (Elhariry): In this course we will focus on the celebrated French playwright Molière.  We will read his works in their seventeenth-century context, analyze how these plays were produced, and study Molière's impact on French culture today.  The final project may consist of a staging of one of Molière's comedies, depending on student interest.

        French 55: French Culture and Politics at TBD (St. Clair): This course will study the broad field of French civilization with a variety of approaches. Literary texts may be studied for their political influence; literature may be seen as a way of changing history or a reflection of history. Writings on cultural or political issues, by such figures as Montaigne, Diderot or de Staël, may also be included as may more current works from the field of cultural criticism.   

        French 87: Independent Reading and Research (Arranged, all terms) A program of individual study directed by a member of the staff. Open only to French, French Studies and Romance Language Majors. By special permission this course may be taken more than once. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term.

        French 89: Honors Seminar (Arranged, all terms) Honors students will arrange a program of study and research during any term of the senior year on a tutorial basis with individual faculty members. A thesis, written in French, and a public presentation are the normal culmination of this course. A proposal, signed by the faculty advisor, must be submitted to the Departmental Committee on Independent Studies and Honors Theses for approval by the fifth day of classes of the term. For information about application procedures, please review the Honors Program section.

        FSP in Paris (Hollister)