2022-2023 French Courses

Summer 2022 Courses

French 08: Exploring French Culture and Language at 10 (Méfoude-Obiono):  Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.

Prerequisites: French 3 or equivalent preparation.

Dist: SOC; WCult: W

French 10.21: "Crises and Tragedies in French Literature and Film, 16th-21st Centuries" at 2A (Cabanel):  French history is largely a progression from one crisis to another, and is marked by a number of major tragedies and conflicts. This course will examine literary and cinematic representations of these major events, which have helped to shape the modern French nation. By examining novels, stories, poems, and films, students will learn about key historical moments ranging from the Wars of Religion to the French revolution, Jansenism, 19th century revolts and uprisings, the Dreyfus Affair, the World Wars, the end of colonialism, and problems of integration and multi-culturalism in contemporary France.

Prerequisite: French 8 or permission of the individual instructor.
Dist: LIT; WCult: W

French 40.08:  "The French Novel from the 16th Through the 21st Centuries" at 10A (Cabanel):  French writers helped to invent the modern genre of the novel, which is a literary mode of representing and thinking about a range of issues:  the relation of the individual to collective groups; the difficulties of love relationships; the challenge of making a reputation in the city; the difference between Paris and the Provinces; the influence of capitalism on modern society; the importance of memory to one's identity and perception. Students will learn to think about, to discuss, and to describe how novels depict and explore these kinds of problems.

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor
Distributive: LIT; WCult:W

Fall 2022 Courses

French 01: 2 Sections (McConnell) at 10, (Méfoude-Obiono) at 11.

French 02: 2 Sections (Kane) at 12 and 2.

French 03: 4 Sections (Mosenthal) at 9L and 10, (Doyle) at 11 and 12.

French 08: 2 Sections (Méfoude-Obiono) at 12, (LaGuardia) at 2.  Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts. 
Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 11: Intensive French (McConnell) at 9L:  This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. 

French 10.03:  Introduction to French Literature, "Invitation au Voyage" (Beasley) at 12:  In this course we will examine travel narratives as well as literary works that inspire us to travel physically and metaphorically.  How do words express as well as transform the traveler's experience?  How do we engage with other worlds through literature?  How do texts create other worlds?  We will examine texts and their contexts from the middle ages to the present. Dist:  LIT; WCult: W.

Prerequisite:  French 8 or permission of the instructor.

French 10.17:  Introduction to French Literature, "Saints, Martyrs, Demons" (Hollister) at 11: Many of French fiction's most iconic characters have been marked as holy or unholy, saintly or damned. This course will ask what the famous saints, martyrs and demons of French cultural history have to say about morality, politics, and social issues (notably class, gender, race, and sexuality). Works by Racine, Voltaire, Sade, Diderot, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Eluard, Aragon, Bataille, Sartre, Barthes, Clouzot, Bresson, Césaire, and Yourcenar. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

Prerequisite: French 8 or permission of the individual instructor.

French 40.04: "Molière à 400 ans" (Beasley) at 2: Molière is France's best known and most universally loved playwright.  This year has seen an explosion of colloquia, new books, and new stagings of his works to mark the 400th anniversary of his birth.  In this course we will draw upon this renewed interest to examine the phenomenon that is Molière.  Our analysis will begin with Molière's original context, seventeenth-century France and court of the Sun King, asking questions such as:  How did Molière create a new form of comedy? What was the role of theatre in society? What was the relationship between politics and theatre?   How did the public experience Molière's comedy?  The goal of course is not simply to get to know the 17th century and Molière.  We will use Molière to interrogate larger questions such as: How does one playwright come to represent a culture?  How does Molière become a myth?  How do theatrical practices change over time and why?  How has Molière has been used and to what ends?  Why do we refer to the French language as "la langue de Molière?"  We will study productions of Molière's plays in different contexts, from eighteenth-century Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) to 21st-century Brooklyn and the theatre company "Molière in the Park."  You will develop a knowledge of the most important periods of French history and culture, as well as one of its most famous writers.  But we will also interrogate his relevance today in France and outside of the hexagon.  We will interrogate the role of theatre/art in general in the construction of national memory, identity, and history. Throughout the course there will be a number of guest lectures by leading specialists in the US, the UK, and France.

In consultation with the professor and the major/minor advisor, this course can be used to fulfill the Fr. 22/23 requirement for the major or minor, as well as the pre-19th-century requirement. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

Prerequisite: French 10 or permission of the instructor.

French 50.05: Montaigne and Proust at 10A (Kritzman): Montaigne and Proust, two of the greatest prose writers in the French literary tradition, represent distinct historical periods (the Renaissance and early twentieth century France) in which the idea of subjectivity is a major intellectual concern. Using Montaigne and Proust's first person narratives as emblematic of their times, the course will examine how self-portraiture is manifested in time and space and reflects upon broader notions of character, sensation, gender and sexuality, history and memory. Particular attention will be payed to how writing can be viewed as a way to suspend time, delay death and prolong life and sensation. Paradoxically we shall discover in each writer the failure of "autobiographical" narrative to establish identity. Selections will include representative Essais of Montaigne, Proust's Du coté de chez Swann and Le temps retrouvé, and short essays by Bergson, Bersani, Deleuze, de Man, Derrida, Genette, Kristeva and Lacan. Dist: LIT; WCult:W

Prerequisite: French 10 or permission of the instructor.

French 75, "French Cinema from the Golden Age to the Present (Hollister) at 2A: An overview of French cinema from the silent era to the contemporary. Examines films associated with major social and cultural movements in France – surrealism, modernism(s), poetic realism, Left Bank cinema, the New Wave, social cinema, postmodernism(s), feminist and queer cinema, postcolonial cinema – as well as genres like melodrama, comedy, romance, crime film. Dist:ART; WCult:W

Prerequisite:  French 10 series or permission of the intstructor.

Winter 2023 Courses

French 01: 2 sections at TBD (Kane and Gavat)

French 02: 2 sections at TBD (Mosenthal)

French 03: 3 sections (Méfoude and McConnell)

French 08: 1 section  at TBD (Méfoude) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts. Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 07: First Year Seminar at TBD: Sanders 

French 10.16: The Feeling of Love at TBD (Elhariry): An introduction to the origins of the feeling of love: French literature explained through love, from the Middle Ages to the modern moment, in Tristan et Iseut, and in poems, plays, essays, short stories, and novels by Louise Labé, Montaigne, Du Bellay, Ronsard, Racine, Marivaux, Rousseau, Voltaire, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Flaubert, Houellebecq. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

Prerequisite: French 8 or permission of the individual instructor.

French 20.03: Long Live the Revolution at TBD (Sanders): This course is a study of the French and Haitian Revolutions through cultural artefacts: films, novels, plays, history textbooks, public debates and even video games. Ever since Revolutions ricocheted from the Americas to Europe and back, artists and writers have crafted versions of their legacy in a variety of venues and media. We will begin the term with an overview of the French and Haitian Revolutions. This course, however, is not about the history of these Revolutions. Instead, we will examine how French and Haitian cultural artefacts craft different versions of their founding moment in an attempt to construct Republican identities. During the term, we will encounter Republican identities that are nationalist, egalitarian, communitarian and post-colonial. By comparing the quantity and type of representations between the Haitian and French Revolutions, we will also interrogate how cultural artefacts are constantly re-imagining the past.

French 25: Introduction to French Literature and Culture IV: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries at TBD (Hollister): This course examines the radical transformations of literary form and vision that characterize twentieth-century France with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to French identity posed by immigration and globalization. We will use lyric poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and film to explore literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the new novel, the theater of the absurd and écriture féminine, as well as the recent impact of immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Proust, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Delbo, Cixous, Sebbar, Resnais, Malle, and Kassovitz.

French 78: Senior Major Workshop at TBD (Elhariry): As part of this culminating experience, each major will work on an independent project, either a senior thesis or expanding upon work begun in a previous course. The independent project will be developed within the framework of this course using a selection of critical texts that can be viewed as models of literary, cultural, and historical analysis. Lectures by a variety of faculty members will supplement the readings. Students will gain mastery in literary and cultural analysis, close analytical reading skills and composition in French.  French 78 may be used to continue research on your honors thesis.  This course is open only to French and Italian Department senior majors or by petition, which is due by the fifth day of classes of Fall term.

LSA/LSA+ Toulouse: St. Clair 

FSP Paris: Beasley

Spring 2023 Courses

French 01: 1 section (Mosenthal)

French 02: 2 sections (McConnelll)

French 03: 3 sections (TBD)

French 08: 1 section (Méfoude-ObionoPractice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 11: 1 section at TBD (Mosenthal) This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. 

French 10: 2 sections (Elhariry & TBD) 

French 40.05: Acting French at TBD (Sanders): Acting French offers a practical approach to French theater. Throughout the trimester, we will read, analyze and then perform scenes from French plays. In this class, you will have an opportunity to bring Figaro to life, or to wait for Godot. By the end of the trimester, we will learn how to interpret theater as a performance, and use that knowledge to put on scenes from plays. Dist:ART; WCult:W

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor.

French 70.02: Francophone Literature at TBD (Elhariry): This course will involve the study of Francophone literature outside Europe. This may include the literature of Africa, the Caribbean, Québec and Southeast Asia. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor

 

FSP Paris: LaGuardia