2022-2023 French Courses

Scheduling Note

This page was updated on 11/5/21 and is subject to change. 

 

Summer 2022 Courses

French 08: Exploring French Culture and Language at TBD (McConnell): Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.

In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

Prerequisites: French 3 or equivalent preparation.

Dist: SOC; WCult: W

French 10: Introduction to French Literature at TBD: These courses, offered each term by various members of the Department, deal in major figures, themes, or issues of modern French literature, and of those earlier periods which have particular relevance to today's world. Techniques of critical reading and interpretation are studied as an approach to these topics, which reflect the interests of the teaching staff. In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

Prerequisite: French 8 or permission of the individual instructor.
Dist: LIT; WCult: W

French 45: French Literature: The Approach through Periodization at TBD: French literature has traditionally been divided into chronological blocks that receive descriptive names: classicism for the seventeenth century; Enlightenment for the eighteenth century; etc. In this course, one or more periods will be selected for intensive study in the light of fundamental questions about the historical process. 

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor
Distributive: LIT; WCult:W

 

Fall 2022 Courses

French 01: 2 Sections (Lerme)

French 02: 3 Sections (Kane & McConnell)

French 03: 4 Sections (Mosenthal & TBD)

French 08: 2 Sections (LaGuardia) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 11: Intensive French: 1 Section (McConnell):  This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. 

French 10.03: Invitation au Voyage (Beasley):  In this course we will examine travel narratives as well as literary works that inspire us to travel physically and metaphorically.  How do words express as well as transform the traveler's experience?  How do we engage with other worlds through literature?  How do texts create other worlds?  We will examine texts and their contexts from the middle ages to the present.

French 10: Introduction to French Literature at 12: (Hollister) These courses, offered each term by various members of the Department, deal in major figures, themes, or issues of modern French literature, and of those earlier periods which have particular relevance to today's world. Techniques of critical reading and interpretation are studied as an approach to these topics, which reflect the interests of the teaching staff. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

Prerequisite: French 8 or permission of the individual instructor.

French 23: (Beasley) Introduction to French Literature II: Neoclassicism & The 18th Century at TBD: The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were a dynamic and volatile period characterized on the one hand by the rise to power of the most absolute of all monarchs, the Sun King Louis XIV, symbolized by Versailles, and on the other hand by the French Revolution. Fostered by royal patronage, literature and the arts flourished, yet many writers also used artistic expression to counter this royal power. The period saw the birth of the modern French novel and the development of a rich body of theatrical and philosophical literature. These centuries are recognized as major components of France's collective identity and their influence is still felt in France today. Authors may include Descartes, Corneille, Racine, Molière, Lafayette, Diderot, Rousseau, Voltaire, Graffigny, Beaumarchais and Laclos. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series, or permission of the instructor.

French 21: Introduction to Francophone Literature and Culture at TBD: This course surveys the evolution of French language (Francophone) literature of the former French colonies and examines the social, political, and cultural issues it raises: race, colonialism, decolonization, revolution, independence, neo-colonialism, Négritude, Antillanité, Créolité, écriture féminine, mimetic desire, cultural hybridity, post-independence government and society. The survey will include novels, plays, poetry, film and essays by representative writers from the principal divisions of the Francophone world: the French West Indies, the Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa; Quebec, and Francophone Canada. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor.
 

French 40: French Literature: The Approach Through Genre at TBD: This course will be devoted to significant examples of a particular literary genre. Genres may be defined historically: thus epic is recognized in its medieval form; tragedy receives its normative definition during classicism. Genres may also be defined formally so that narrative may be studied as it evolves across several centuries. Issues to be considered may include the way genre shapes the production and reception of literary texts and the relationship between historical and generic determinants of a given work. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor.
 

French 50: French Literature: Major Figures at 10A (Kritzman): This course will be devoted to the study of a single author or to a group of authors who have exercised a decisive influence on French, European or world literature or who are deserving of concentrated attention because of the quality or originality of their literary production. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor

French 75: Cinema and Modern Life at 2A (Hollister): This course will propose a historical overview of French cinema, with a particular emphasis on the relationship between cinema and the idea of the modern or modernity. How was cinema perceived as a modern, technological art? How was cinema positioned in relation to utopian and dystopian visions of industrial capitalist modernity? How did cinema contribute to these visions? To respond to these questions, this course will examine texts and films associated with many of the most important cultural, intellectual, and political movements in twentieth-century France: socialism, communism, anarchism, naturalism, surrealism, modernism(s), poetic realism, Left Bank cinema, the New Wave, cinéma vérité, formalism, le cinéma du look, postmodernism(s). Dist:ART; WCult:W

 

 

Winter 2023 Courses

French 01: 2 sections (Kane)

French 02: 2 sections (McConnell & TBD)

French 03: 3 sections (Mosenthal and TBD)

French 08: 2 sections (Sanders and Tarnowski) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 07: First Year Seminar @ TBD: Sanders 

French 10.16: The Feeling of Love at TBD (Elhariry): An introduction to the origins of the feeling of love: French literature explained through love, from the Middle Ages to the modern moment, in Tristan et Iseut, and in poems, plays, essays, short stories, and novels by Louise Labé, Montaigne, Du Bellay, Ronsard, Racine, Marivaux, Rousseau, Voltaire, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Flaubert, Houellebecq. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.

Prerequisite: French 8 or permission of the individual instructor.

French 20.03: Long Live the Revolution at TBD (Sanders): This course is a study of the French and Haitian Revolutions through cultural artefacts: films, novels, plays, history textbooks, public debates and even video games. Ever since Revolutions ricocheted from the Americas to Europe and back, artists and writers have crafted versions of their legacy in a variety of venues and media. We will begin the term with an overview of the French and Haitian Revolutions. This course, however, is not about the history of these Revolutions. Instead, we will examine how French and Haitian cultural artefacts craft different versions of their founding moment in an attempt to construct Republican identities. During the term, we will encounter Republican identities that are nationalist, egalitarian, communitarian and post-colonial. By comparing the quantity and type of representations between the Haitian and French Revolutions, we will also interrogate how cultural artefacts are constantly re-imagining the past.

French 25: Introduction to French Literature and Culture IV: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries at 2 (Hollister): This course examines the radical transformations of literary form and vision that characterize twentieth-century France with its two World Wars, its colonial conflicts, and the challenges to French identity posed by immigration and globalization. We will use lyric poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and film to explore literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the new novel, the theater of the absurd and écriture féminine, as well as the recent impact of immigrant and minority writers. Readings and films may include works by Proust, Breton, Colette, Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Delbo, Cixous, Sebbar, Resnais, Malle, and Kassovitz.

French 40: Acting French: (TBD) Acting French is a practical approach to French theater and its role in constructing French identity. Throughout the trimester, we will read, analyze, watch and then perform scenes from French plays. By the end of the trimester, we will learn how to interpret theater as a performance, and use that knowledge to perform scenes from plays. Works by Marivaux, Racine, Musset, Beckett, Mnouchkine, and others. Dist: LIT; WCult:W

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor.

French 78: Senior Major Workshop: Elhariry As part of this culminating experience, each major will work on an independent project, either a senior thesis or expanding upon work begun in a previous course. The independent project will be developed within the framework of this course using a selection of critical texts that can be viewed as models of literary, cultural, and historical analysis. Lectures by a variety of faculty members will supplement the readings. Students will gain mastery in literary and cultural analysis, close analytical reading skills and composition in French.  French 78 may be used to continue research on your honors thesis.  This course is open only to French and Italian Department senior majors or by petition, which is due by the fifth day of classes of Fall term.

LSA/LSA+ Toulouse: St. Clair 

FSP Paris: Beasley

Spring 2023 Courses

French 01: 1 section (Mosenthal)

French 02: 2 sections (McConnelll)

French 03: 3 sections (TBD)

French 08: 1 sections (Tarnowski) Practice in the active use of the language combined with an introduction to major aspects of French society. Each week students will write papers and participate in discussions based on books, articles, and films emphasizing social and historical concepts.  In the event that French 8 isn't offered, you may take French 10, with the understanding that your next French course will be French 8.  Dist:SOC; WCult:W

French 07: First Year Seminar @ TBD: Sanders 

French 11: 1 section at TBD (Mosenthal) This 1-credit course is designed for students who have studied French for one to three years in high school, or those who have been exposed to French through family ties or have spent some time in a Francophone environment. It is also suitable for students with little or no knowledge of the French language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Catalan, and also Latin).  French 11 is an accelerated course that combines French 1 and 2 in one term, offering an exciting and fast-paced atmosphere in which to learn French. 

French 10: 2 sections (Elhariry & St. Clair) 

French 22:  Introduction to French Literature I: the Middle Ages and the Renaissance at TBD (Tarnowski) Medieval France - its art, architecture, technology, philosophy and literature - exerted an unparalleled influence throughout Europe. Studying the first texts written in French, as well as the manuscripts in which they circulated, will shed light on the nature of French culture. We will examine defining issues of the period: the transition from oral to written expression, the invention of printing, debates concerning the status of women, Renaissance humanism, scientific inquiry, religious reform and conflict. Texts may include La Chanson de Roland, selected poetry, and works by Chrétien de Troyes, Christine de Pizan, Marguerite de Navarre, François Rabelais, and Michel de Montaigne. Dist:LIT: WCult:W

French 24: Introduction to French Literature and Culture III: 19th Century at 2A (St. Clair): This course examines the nineteenth-century renewal of literary form and vision from the French Revolution to the First World War. We will study the social and historical developments of French culture as they are reflected in various literary genres (narrative, poetry, dramatic theory and practice), literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and the other arts. Emphasis will be placed on France's growing self-awareness as a nation and on the analysis of aesthetic and intellectual issues represented in the major literary movements of this period including romanticism, realism, symbolism, art for art's sake, naturalism, fin de siècle decadence, and modernism. Readings may include works by such authors as Chateaubriand, de Staël, Stendhal, Hugo, Musset, Sand, Balzac, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Michelet, Zola, and Huysmans.

French 40.05: Acting French at TBD (Sanders): Acting French offers a practical approach to French theater. Throughout the trimester, we will read, analyze and then perform scenes from French plays. In this class, you will have an opportunity to bring Figaro to life, or to wait for Godot. By the end of the trimester, we will learn how to interpret theater as a performance, and use that knowledge to put on scenes from plays. Dist:ART; WCult:W

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor.

French 70.02: Francophone Literature at TBD (Elhariry): This course will involve the study of Francophone literature outside Europe. This may include the literature of Africa, the Caribbean, Québec and Southeast Asia. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies

Prerequisite: A course in the FREN 10 series or permission of the instructor

 

FSP Paris: LaGuardia